A Cauldron, Evolution and Trikonasana: Developing My Own Voice

25 Feb 2012

Trikonasana – sketch by Emily Sloat Shaw     For the longest time I have been amazed and sometimes perplexed by the vast number of ways to teach and perform asana.  There are factions who teach yoga from a perspective of fluidity being paramount – not concerning about alignment but rather concerned only with the feeling of life force moving in the body.  Other equally valid perspectives include those clearly invested in the importance of alignment, biomechanics, meditation and chakras.  And within each of these perspectives there are endless variations.  How does a practitioner know what way to practice or what guidelines to follow in performing asana? A key moment came to me not long ago when I found.

Yoga’s Guarantee – Liking vs. Learning

08 Feb 2012

Since I’m on a bit of theme of confessions (see last post) here’s another one: I don’t always like yoga. I know, shouldn’t I always be singing yoga’s praises?  Be an eternal advocate for it’s miraculous wonderment? In actuality, liking yoga has little to do with it’s transformative power.  We get so caught up in our desire for constant pleasure and gratification that when we are confronted with a pose that’s awkward or too challenging or too easy our tendency is to toss the vessel of such displeasure out the door.  There goes that posture, or that teacher or yoga altogether.And what do we miss when we do this?  An grand opportunity to learn.  Take back bending for example.  I.